The trade has overwhelmingly come out in support of backing a resurrected Super Break.

Original founder of the collapsed short‑break operator Gordon Miller is hoping to buy the much‑loved brand from administrators KPMG.

Gordon Miller set up the business with a colleague in 1983 and wants to relaunch a “stripped down” Super Break that would sell fully bonded hotel-only bookings.


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Following the news, hundreds of agents have said they would support him if the deal went through.

Travel Weekly ran a number of polls on social media asking if they would back the brand if it made a return.

A total of 580 agents on Travel Weekly and travel agency forum Travel Gossip’s pages said they would and 60 said they would not.

The results were similar on Instagram and Twitter.

On Instagram 70% of participants said yes and 30% said no. On Twitter 63% of respondents said they would back a new Super Break and 37% said no.

But a handful of agents who said ‘no’ said the brand was “tainted”.

Miller said: “I’m absolutely delighted and overwhelmed by the level of response.

“I completely understand there are agents who have potentially lost money or lost confidence in the brand. If we were coming to own the business we would take that very seriously and would look to help whoever has supported the brand but also try and target those that haven’t and try and bring those into the business.”

Super Break ceased trading on August 1 after parent company the Malvern Group failed to find investment or a buyer.

It collapsed with 400 customers overseas and 20,000 forward bookings affecting 53,000 customers.

A number of agents have been left out of pocket after it emerged hotel-only bookings were not bonded.

Miller said he would bond all products. “There would be no wriggle room if disaster did strike,” he said. “We will make sure the bond is impenetrable.”

Miller is currently in talks with administrators and is in the process of putting together a bid for the brand.

“We have a lot of information requests with the administrators and we are waiting for the answers. We are working non-stop and as soon as we get the information we requested we will be building a financial model and looking at risk assessment.”

KPMG said it had received “significant interest” in the brand.

Travel Weekly understands bids for the failed operator must be lodged with KPMG by August 19.

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