Ella Buchan gives an at-a-glance guide to what’s new and happening in the Polish capital.

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Visitors are never far from greenery in Warsaw. Perhaps the city’s most famous, and vast, park is Łazienki, with immaculately kept lawns, elegant tree-flanked boulevards and eclectic structures from a lakeside amphitheatre to a 17th-century bathhouse that was later converted into a palace for Poland’s final king. Free summer concerts are held by the bronze Chopin Monument, with classical musicians playing works by the Warsaw-raised composer.

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Make time for

In the past, few tourists crossed the river to the Praga district, but spaces such as the Soho Factory – a compact hub with design shops, murals and restaurants on a former factory site – are changing that. Its Neon Museum highlights the city’s post-Second World War history one glowing tube at a time, with restored signage from cinemas, hotels and libraries.

Where to stay

Close to the airport and a short drive or taxi to Old Town Warsaw, the design-led Vienna House Mokotów is geared towards business travellers. With super-comfy beds, sleek bathrooms and a plant-filled restaurant specialising in local produce, it makes a chilled-out base for leisure travellers, too. Weekend rates are cheaper, starting at £47 per night including breakfast (£70 on weeknights).

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Dine out

Chef Robert Sowa is a household name in Poland thanks to TV appearances and high-profile gigs such as cooking for the national football team. The menu at his latest opening, N31 focuses on classic Polish cuisine with a fine-dining polish, served in a sleek dining room with wooden floors, exposed brick and industrial-style light fittings. Dishes include deer carpaccio, baked cod in butter sauce, and duck breast confit with currant sauce.

What’s new

Occupying a former distillery in the Praga district, the Polish Vodka Museum has been a temple to the deceptively simple spirit since it opened last summer. A series of galleries traces 600 years of production in Poland, with galleries showcasing label designs and interactive exhibits on the distillation process and traditional Polish toasts (“fish likes to swim” is one of many popular phrases when clinking glasses). Visitors can stay for a guided tasting or try an innovative cocktail in Bar 3/4, inside the museum building.

Getting there

LOT Polish Airlines flies to Warsaw from London City and Heathrow, from £99 return.

For clients looking to discover a different side to the city, suggest Adventure Warsaw. Tours in vintage Nysa vans cover pre-war and communist Warsaw, combining popular attractions with lesser-explored stops.

Go to poland.travel/en and warsawtour.pl/en for more destination information.


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