Rupert Hogg has quit as chief executive of Cathay Pacific following the pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong.

Paul Loo has also resigned from his role as chief customer and commercial officer.

Augustus Tang will succeed Hogg as chief executive, and Ronald Lam will replace Loo.

Anti-government protests forced the closure of Hong Kong’s airport, resulting in the cancellation of hundreds of flights.

Shares in Cathay Pacific dived on Monday (August 12) after the Chinese government told the airline to ban staff who had taken part in Hong Kong protests.


MoreFlights resume at Hong Kong airport

Cathay Pacific shares hit by Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protests: Chinese state media hits out at Cathay Pacific


China’s aviation authority also ordered the airline to remove crew from flights into China if they had taken part in protests against the Hong Kong government’s extradition bill.

Members of Cathay Pacific cabin crew were involved in a protest at the airport and the Hong Kong pilots’ union supported a Cathay Pacific pilot who is among protestors charged with rioting.

Hogg said: “These have been challenging weeks for the airline and it is right that Paul and I take responsibility as leaders of the company.”

John Slosar, chairman of Cathay Pacific, commented: “Recent events have called into question Cathay Pacific’s commitment to flight safety and security and put our reputation and brand under pressure.

“This is regrettable as we have always made safety and security our highest priority.

“We therefore think it is time to put a new management team in place who can reset confidence and lead the airline to new heights.

“Cathay Pacific is fully committed to Hong Kong under the principle of ‘One Country Two Systems’ as enshrined in the Basic Law.”

He added: “Augustus Tang and Ronald Lam have the experience and depth of knowledge of aviation and our people to be strong and effective leaders of Cathay Pacific at this sensitive time.”

MoreFlights resume at Hong Kong airport

Cathay Pacific shares hit by Hong Kong protests

Hong Kong protests: Chinese state media hits out at Cathay Pacific