Are you looking for a new job in travel? Linda Fox talks to the recruitment experts to get some advice on how to manage job-hunting and interviews


Waiting for a job interview


So, you’re looking for a new job in travel, but you want to handle it in the right way and act professionally.


Here are some tips from recruitment experts on the right and wrong way to go about it. Happy job hunting…


The right way to job-hunt


Do make sure your application goes to the right person if you’re applying for a job at a rival agency where existing colleagues know some of the staff.


Explain the sensitive nature of the situation to your potential employer and request the interview be away from the workplace and somewhere neutral.


New Frontiers director of executive search and selection Marie Moore said: “Going to the premises is a big no-no, especially in this industry.”


Do think about using a recruitment agency as there are many benefits, such as access to a range of positions, industry knowledge, interview tips and career advice.


Agencies will also keep it confidential, organise everything, help you through the whole process and provide feedback. Advice will also, in general, be free.
 
C&M Recruitment sales manager Barbara Kolosinska said: “The current market is candidate driven, so you should use a recruitment agency. You will only have to submit your CV once, rather than sending out multiple applications.”


Do keep it to yourself while you have a look around to see what jobs are out there. The more people that know, the more likely it is to get back to your boss.


When you are in the final stages, it is a good idea to let your boss know what’s going on. You never know when your paths might cross again.


Do consider the possibility of a phone interview, especially if you’re having difficulty getting time off for an initial interview. According to New Frontiers, more travel companies are considering phone interviews.


Moore said: “You could have a telephone interview during a lunch break. Some companies are doing up to six interviews for a job and that is hard for candidates. So, it’s a good idea to get some of the information across over the phone.”


Do make sure you’re prepared for the interview. Find out as much as possible about the company and the role you are applying for in advance.


Also, check out websites such as totaljobs.co.uk and specialist travel recruitment agency websites for more advice.


Do use a recruitment agency if you’re really concerned about going to a rival company and confidentiality. They can persuade potential employers to be flexible about times and places for interviews.


AA Appointments managing director John Tolmie: “If confidentiality is paramount, also ask that your details are only discussed with relevant people within the organisation.”


Do try to squeeze more than one interview into the same day to make the most of your time. It will also mean you don’t have to keep asking for time off.


The wrong way to job-hunt


Don’t tell your boss unless you feel a particular loyalty to them. It will create an awkward atmosphere and could cost you the job you are in.


However, it is a good idea to give them an opportunity to keep you, so somewhere along the process, try to air any issues such as salary and career path. That way, when it comes to leaving, you’ve done everything properly.


Don’t lie about an interview and say you’re going to the dentist. Book time off instead, otherwise it will just make you nervous all day that you’ll be found out.


If it’s difficult to take time out, try to arrange for the interview to be before or after working hours. More and more companies are open to this.


Tolmie said: “Before work or after hours is always preferable to the dentist excuse.”