Over the past six months, it could have been tempting to give a running commentary on the latest Brexit updates and the effect that each individual machination, recommendation and forecast was having on the travel industry.

As a trade publication, we have instead attempted to assess each development on its merits, using verified booking data and objective expert guidance to get past the often scaremongering headlines in the national media and present the facts about the current state of play and the potential impact on our readers.

As we approached the original deadline for the UK to leave the EU this week, Brexit was certainly impossible to ignore, and there is no doubt that ongoing uncertainty and further delays will not be overly conducive to improved customer confidence.

The latest figures from analyst GfK also suggest a clear impact on bookings in recent weeks, though it is important to remember that the outbound market has remained remarkably resilient over the past two years.

The message from many industry leaders from the start of this process has been to focus on what you can control, rather than worrying unduly about what you can’t.

That hasn’t meant sticking heads in the sand, of course, and prudent planning, clear guidance and a proactive strategy are key to plotting a course through this period of uncertainty.

But the industry has proved itself adept at dealing with an array of challenges over many decades. This professionalism and ability to adapt should be a source of reassurance as the trade awaits some clarity on what the immediate future is likely to hold.

Comment from Travel Weekly, March 28 edition

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