The Foreign Office (FCO) has lifted its warning against all but essential travel to Thailand after political violence eased over the last few days.

The warning was applied last week as anti-government protests spread to the outskirts of Bangkok.

However, the FCO said the situation in Bangkok remained tense and continues to advise against all but essential travel to the capital.

It said: “Travellers should continue to exercise caution throughout Thailand and avoid demonstrations. British nationals in Thailand, or planning to travel there, should also closely monitor FCO travel advice. The situation is unpredictable and could change rapidly.

“We continue to advise against all travel to the Preah Vihear Temple area and advise against all but essential travel to the far southern provinces of Pattani, Yala, Narathiwat and Songkhla.”

The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) and the Royal Thai Embassy met the FCO on Thursday and asked it to reduce the warning level.

In a statement issued to the trade TAT said: “We hope your customers still wish to travel and choose to spend more time in other destinations across the country. There is no doubt that this news brings a great sigh of relief, and I hope that business will return to normal as quickly as possible for you all.”

Earlier this week, the Thai government set out a ‘road map’ to bring almost two months of unrest to an end. Prime minister Abhisit Vejjajiva suggested parliament could be dissolved in September and elections held on 14 November.

It is remains to be seen whether this will satisfy the Red Shirt protesters, who are still encamped in Bangkok.