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Brits to spend £40bn+ on overseas holidays in 2022

Half of Brits are already planning a holiday abroad in 2022, with more than £40 billion likely to be spent on overseas trips, according to a survey.

The findings come from a poll of 2,000 people conducted on behalf of American Express, which said 2022 will be “a bumper year for travel”.

Respondents are expecting their holiday to cost £1,567 on average, with a fifth (21%) planning to spend £2,000 or more.

In total, £41.2 billion is earmarked for international holidays next year, according to the research.

More than a quarter (27%) are planning to spend more this year than on their holiday last year.

Furthermore, two fifths (44%) of Brits are planning to go on holiday both in the UK and abroad.


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The main reason for wanting an overseas trip was because respondents miss travelling internationally (32%). A fifth (21%) want to celebrate occasions they missed amid the pandemic, and 16% want to take advantage of airline and accommodation offers.

For those Brits who are delaying booking, the main reason given was to “wait and see how the pandemic progresses” (55%), while a third (33%) are waiting for restrictions to ease.

The research also revealed that nearly a quarter (24%) of those surveyed have not left the UK at all during the pandemic.

June and July are the most popular months for next year’s holidaymakers, and Spain tops the destination list with a fifth (21%) planning a trip there, followed by Greece (14%), France (13%) and Italy (13%).

Smaller proportions cited long-haul destinations, with 9% planning to visit the US, 6% looking to go to the Caribbean and 5% wanting to head to Australia.

Picture by Irina Crick/shutterstock.com

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