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MSC Cruises names latest EVO class ship

MSC Cruises has revealed the name of its second Seaside EVO class ship at the coin ceremony for the vessel.

Construction on MSC Seascape, due to be delivered in November 2022, continued today at Fincantieri’s shipyard in Monfalcone, Italy.

Two coins were placed under the ship’s keel to bless the vessel and give it good fortune in line with maritime tradition.

MSC Seascape, the sister ship to MSC Seashore, will be able to carry 5,877 passengers across 2,270 cabins and will have 13,000 square metres of outdoor space.

MSC said MSC Seascape will have 12 cabin and suite categories, plus 11 dining venues, 19 bars and lounges, and six swimming pools.


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Pierfrancesco Vago (pictured), MSC Cruises’ executive chairman, said the ship would be the first in the fleet to feature the “dynamic and exciting” RoboCoaster experience, but did not reveal any more details about the feature.

Luxury area MSC Yacht Club will be largest of its type in the MSC fleet with almost 3,000 square metres of space.

MSC Seascape will also have selective catalytic reduction systems on each engine to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 90%. Gas will be converted into nitrogen and water.

Vago said: “MSC Seascape represents our continued investment in this yard and region as well as our drive to advance with our long-term vision to achieve net zero-impact cruise operations.

“MSC Seascape will generate meaningful economic impact not only for the shipbuilding industry and its entire supply chain but for all the ports and destinations that it reaches, strengthening coastal tourism and supporting the vital economic recovery of local communities.”

MSC Seascape is one of three MSC vessels currently under construction.

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